applevevo:

listening to a sad song that has a nice beat

image

(via tyleroakley)

Tags: life

scienceyoucanlove:

Great news! ReWalk, a motorised exoskeleton suit that helps people who are paralysed from the waist down to stand up and walk again, has been approved for personal use: http://bit.ly/1qddmGu
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Great news! ReWalk, a motorised exoskeleton suit that helps people who are paralysed from the waist down to stand up and walk again, has been approved for personal use: http://bit.ly/1qddmGu

source 

tastefullyoffensive:

I see what you did there. [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

I see what you did there. [x]

Tags: haha

rfmmsd:

Artist & Illustrator:

Dani Soon

"Lotus and Frogs"

Digital Painting

2014

http://www.soonillustration.com/

(Source: facebook.com)

jtotheizzoe:

pbsdigitalstudios:

This week It’s Okay to be Smart and BrainCraft have teamed up to teach us about our brains!

Watch “Why Your Brain Is In Your Head” on Joe’s channel here: http://youtu.be/qdNE4WygyAk

Watch “This Is How Your Brain Grows” on Vanessa’s channel here: http://youtu.be/aucscX191vQ

Check out this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart!!!

I teamed up with the awesome neuroscience channel BrainCraft this week to bring you two awesome brain stories!! And while you’re at it, enjoy these GIF(t)s!

captainmaund:

fandom-for-fun:

rel4d2:

the-mispookyvous-loki:

gingeronastick:

ganderbulbs:

bouderie:

nintendonut1:

breathingocean:

image

reblog because wow what a great quality audio file this is

wow this file really is high quality

im kind of shocked 

i thought the comments were being sarcastic im not sure if im disappointed or not

dude holy shit you’re right.

IT’S SO CRISP MY MOUTH DROPPED OPEN

God this is so catchy

THIS IS BETTER SOUNDING THAN I HEARD IT ON MY TV 2 DAYS AGO. WTF IS THIS

my favorite song on the planet

(Source: 123029393, via the-art-student-in-221c)

medicalschool:

Woman declared ‘dead’ awakens just before doctors harvest her organs
Imagine waking up to see operating room lights and doctors standing over you, armed with scalpels and other operating tools. That’s exactly what happened to 41-year-old Colleen Burns, who had arrived at the emergency room at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center in Syracuse, N.Y., over a week earlier suffering from a drug overdose, Counsel and Heal reported.  Mistakenly believing Burns to be dead, doctors at the center were about to harvest the woman’s organs for transplant, before she opened her eyes.
The 2009 incident is detailed in a recently revealed report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which also lists the series of mistakes by doctors that led to the terrible event. Burns had been found unresponsive, likely due to an overdose of Xanax and Benadryl.  According to the report, hospital specialists recommended treating her with activated charcoals in order to stop the drugs from being absorbed into her stomach and intestines – but the staff failed to follow through with this recommendation. Burns eventually spent over a week at the hospital, with nothing being done to stop the drugs from being absorbed into her system.  She started to suffer from seizures, though CT scans revealed her brain was normal.  
Allegedly, nurses had also indicated improvement in Burns’ condition, noting that she was capable of curling her toes when touched.  She could also move her mouth and tongue, as well as flare her nose, according to Counsel and Heal.  And despite being on a respirator, Burns was starting to breathe on her own, the report said. However, doctors still misdiagnosed Burns with irreversible brain damage. Believing her to be beyond help, Burns’ family decided to take her off life support and donate her organs to patients in need.
The report maintained that not enough tests and brain scans were performed before the diagnosis. “The patient did not suffer a cardiopulmonary arrest [as documented] and did not have irreversible brain damage,” the report revealed. “The patient did not meet criteria for withdrawal of care.” Just before doctors were about to cut into her, Burns awoke, saving her own life.
However, Burns went on to commit suicide in 2011, and no one has ever filed charges against the hospital for the critical mistakes the doctors made. After a review of the incident, the hospital was fined $6,000.
[Read more of this FOX News article here]

medicalschool:

Woman declared ‘dead’ awakens just before doctors harvest her organs

Imagine waking up to see operating room lights and doctors standing over you, armed with scalpels and other operating tools. That’s exactly what happened to 41-year-old Colleen Burns, who had arrived at the emergency room at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center in Syracuse, N.Y., over a week earlier suffering from a drug overdose, Counsel and Heal reported.  Mistakenly believing Burns to be dead, doctors at the center were about to harvest the woman’s organs for transplant, before she opened her eyes.

The 2009 incident is detailed in a recently revealed report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which also lists the series of mistakes by doctors that led to the terrible event. Burns had been found unresponsive, likely due to an overdose of Xanax and Benadryl.  According to the report, hospital specialists recommended treating her with activated charcoals in order to stop the drugs from being absorbed into her stomach and intestines – but the staff failed to follow through with this recommendation. Burns eventually spent over a week at the hospital, with nothing being done to stop the drugs from being absorbed into her system.  She started to suffer from seizures, though CT scans revealed her brain was normal.  

Allegedly, nurses had also indicated improvement in Burns’ condition, noting that she was capable of curling her toes when touched.  She could also move her mouth and tongue, as well as flare her nose, according to Counsel and Heal.  And despite being on a respirator, Burns was starting to breathe on her own, the report said. However, doctors still misdiagnosed Burns with irreversible brain damage. Believing her to be beyond help, Burns’ family decided to take her off life support and donate her organs to patients in need.

The report maintained that not enough tests and brain scans were performed before the diagnosis. “The patient did not suffer a cardiopulmonary arrest [as documented] and did not have irreversible brain damage,” the report revealed. “The patient did not meet criteria for withdrawal of care.” Just before doctors were about to cut into her, Burns awoke, saving her own life.

However, Burns went on to commit suicide in 2011, and no one has ever filed charges against the hospital for the critical mistakes the doctors made. After a review of the incident, the hospital was fined $6,000.

well-it-beats-me:

Of Monsters & Men vs. Imagine Dragons  - Time for Our Little Talks

(via asentenceadayandneveragain)

bpod-mrc:

06 July 2014
Back to Black
The Black Death was certainly a colourful killer. Ravaging Europe in the 14th century, the bubonic plague wiped out between a third and a half of the continent’s population. Carried in the gut of fleas (in purple), the bacteria (shown in yellow) wreaked such wholesale chaos that it changed the very fabric of European culture. Modern antibiotics have mostly consigned the plague to the history books, but 3000 cases are still reported annually. It’s important therefore to understand how the disease strikes with such rapidity that, as a Middle Ages witness noted that victims often “ate lunch with their friends and dinner with their ancestors in paradise”. In fact, it appears that bubonic plague shares genes with several other pathogens that may underlie a common attack mechanism. Unlocking how these genes cause infection could help fight numerous diseases that continue to leave a black mark on our societies.
Written by Jan Piotrowski
—
Image by Bernard Joseph Hinnebusch, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin AthmanNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of HealthOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in PLOS Pathogens, March 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

06 July 2014

Back to Black

The Black Death was certainly a colourful killer. Ravaging Europe in the 14th century, the bubonic plague wiped out between a third and a half of the continent’s population. Carried in the gut of fleas (in purple), the bacteria (shown in yellow) wreaked such wholesale chaos that it changed the very fabric of European culture. Modern antibiotics have mostly consigned the plague to the history books, but 3000 cases are still reported annually. It’s important therefore to understand how the disease strikes with such rapidity that, as a Middle Ages witness noted that victims often “ate lunch with their friends and dinner with their ancestors in paradise”. In fact, it appears that bubonic plague shares genes with several other pathogens that may underlie a common attack mechanism. Unlocking how these genes cause infection could help fight numerous diseases that continue to leave a black mark on our societies.

Written by Jan Piotrowski

Image by Bernard Joseph Hinnebusch, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in PLOS Pathogens, March 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

Tags: genetics

epicukulelesolo:

This is literally the stupidest comic I have ever made and I’m not even sorry

epicukulelesolo:

This is literally the stupidest comic I have ever made and I’m not even sorry

(via theturnofgods)

(Source: jimmyfallongifs, via shiyunkan)

Tags: haha

Tags: word

corporisfabrica:

The osteology of the hand and wrist, from William Cheselden’s Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones (1733) 
These twenty-seven bones afford you the greatest dexterity of all known life on Earth. Opposable thumbs grant humans and some other species the ability to better manipulate their surroundings and make complex tools. 

corporisfabrica:

The osteology of the hand and wrist, from William Cheselden’s Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones (1733) 

These twenty-seven bones afford you the greatest dexterity of all known life on Earth. Opposable thumbs grant humans and some other species the ability to better manipulate their surroundings and make complex tools. 

(via md-admissions)

africafashionweek:

Tanzanian model Herieth Paul for Harpers Bazaar UK August 2014

(Source: continentcreative, via dynamicafrica)

rfmmsd:

Artist & Illustrator:

Belén Moreno

"El Mural del Inconsciente I"

Grafito sobre Estuco Veneciano

30 cm X 40 cm

A Gabriel Moreno Velázquez

“Lo que eres, lo que fuiste y lo que has sido, formará parte de algo igualmente bello, de lo que espero tener el privilegio de volver a enamorarme”

(Source: belenmorenoblog.blogspot.com)